Tuesday, February 28, 2017

22..26-Apr-2017 (HK): Meet Prof. Sivan at CIV2017HK



Together with key industry figures, we will meet for CIV's annual meeting, this time in HK,
to talk about the future of Venture in general and focus on the evolving role of universities.

Here are some more details:

CIV2017HK— the Coller Institute of Venture Annual Conference, will take place on April 22-26, 2017 at the Hong Kong Science Park (main session – April 23, 2017).

The conference will serve an exclusive meeting place for leading players of the venture ecosystem – policymakers, institutional investors, scholars and venture capitalists.

In 2017, the conference will focus on The Future of University Venture, bringing together the greatest minds in the field to trigger the thinking and discussion necessary to evolve research universities into their new role as centers of venture and innovation.

BY JOINING US AT CIV2017HK, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO:

  • Share latest developments, successes, and failures in venture, and university venture in particular;
  • Discuss and reflect to generate new ideas and models;
  • Collaborate and network with exclusive venture leaders;
  • Meet venture luminaries from MIT, Stanford, LBS, TAU, Technion, Peking University and Tsinghua-Shenzhen.
Among the leading speakers that have already confirmed their participation, you will find:


  • Prof. Dan Schechtman — Nobel Prize Laureate (2011) and Distinguished Professor at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology
  • Prof. Dongmin Chen — Director, Office of Science and Technology Development, Peking University
  • Katharine Ku — Executive Director, Office of Technology Licensing, Stanford University
  • Dr. Renchen Liu — President Assistant, Tsinghua-Shenzhen Research Institute
  • Lita Nelsen — Director (Ret.), Technology Licensing Office, MIT
  • Prof. Manuel Trajtenberg — Senior Economist, Parliament Member and Former Chairman of the Higher Education Budgeting and Planning Committee, Israel
If you want to hear these and other leading speakers in the same room, join CIV2017HK now and enjoy a special 20% HIX discount until 31-Mar-2017. Register today with the coupon HIXTIX.

Registered participants will enjoy discounted airfares with our official carrier, Cathay Pacific, and special rates in a wide selection of hotels.


Monday, February 20, 2017

20-Feb-2017: Prof. Sivan chairs VC's/Dealmakers panel at Silicon Dragon event in Tel Aviv





Silicon Dragon forum at Tel Aviv Stock Exchange - CIV's executive director Prof. Yesha Sivan is moderating a VC's/Dealmakers panel. Panelists are: Avishai Silvershatz, Infinity Capital; Lior Simon, Arbor Ventures; Dan Clivner, Sidley; Yonatan Machao, JVP, Yoav Chelouche, Aviv Venture; Jeffrey Chi, Vickers Ventures, Yesha Sivan, Coller Institute of Venture with Rebecca Fannin, Silicon Dragon.

Israeli and Chinese venture capitalists, investors and entrepreneurs met on February 20th, 2017 at the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange for the Silicon Dragon Forum, to discuss the China-Israel-US tech triangle and the increasing role of VCs in the Chinese innovation ecosystem. Among the panelists attending and speaking at the forum were representatives of prominent VCs and angels, corporates (Baidu and IBM), and dealmakers.

https://youtu.be/C8hJSZgD_ZA


Wednesday, February 08, 2017

6-Feb-2017: “De-Know-Polization” Featured at the Israeli Tech Transfer Conference


Prof. Yesha Sivan, Executive Director of the Coller Institute of Venture, gave a keynote lecture at the Israeli Tech Transfer Conference (6-Feb-2017 in Tel Aviv), and spoke of De-Know-Polization – the de-monopolization of knowledge, extensively covered in Issue 4 of Coller Venture Review.
Previously featured also at the Jerusalem Post, “De-Know-Polization” is a global phenomenon spanning academic institutions worldwide and stripping universities of their traditional roles: research, teaching, and societal service. University leaders will need to take actions in order to keep their university running, and justify these actions to their public and private funders, including students paying tuition and taxpayers.
Our message to university leaders and policy-makers, further elaborated in the recent issue of Coller Venture Review is to be aware of the various threats and opportunities, particularly when it comes to the evolving role of universities within the evolving venture ecosystem. Don’t think business is as usual – business as usual now means no business at all in the future. Better you lead the change than let the change lead you.
The future of venture and universities will be further elaborated at #CIV2017HK – the 2017 Annual Conference of the Coller Institute of Venture in Hong Kong (22-26 April 2017). Join us there to meet venture leaders from all over the world, define new pathways for venture and design the universities of the future.




Thursday, December 22, 2016

26-Jan-2017: Prof. Sivan to Deliver a Keynote at IPEM 2017


IPEM 2017

26-Jan-2017 at 9:30am @ Palais des Festivals, Cannes, France



Structured as a marketplace to foster business opportunities between private and institutional investors, investment funds, service providers and business owners seeking to support their company’s development, the International Private Equity Market (IPEM) is the worlds’ biggest Private Equity tradeshow to gather the whole value chain of the PE Industry. This year, IPEM will take place at the Palais des Festivals in Cannes (France), between January 25-27, 2017.

Interview


Prof. Yesha Sivan, CIV Executive Director, will deliver a keynote on tech investments at the Entrepreneurs forum of IPEM, discussing recent trends in tech investments, investment opportunities, and learnings from the Israeli tech miracle. The talk will take place on Thursday, January 26 at 9:30am.

IPEM is the only Private Equity market in Europe, and the second largest PE-Event in Europe, with 1200 participants from 35 countries. This year’s program will focus on technology, with panels and leading companies represented from the fields of FinTech, FoodTech and Big Data.

If you would like to explore CIV and learn more about our activities – meet Yesha at IPEM.


Monday, November 07, 2016

Digital Mindfulness talks Mindful Innovation with Yesha Sivan



In this episode, Lawrence Ampofo speaks with Professor Yesha Sivan, Executive Director of the Coller Institute of Venture at Tel Aviv University, and a visiting Professor of innovation and venture at the Hong Kong Polytechnic Design School.

Digital Mindfulness podcast #56.

In this episode, we talk in depth about the role mindfulness plays in a world that is under constant digital disruption, and under intense pressure to adapt to that shifting landscape. Yesha will go through what it takes to overcome the challenges of ‘technostress’ and how we can all thrive in this connected age.

What You Will Learn In This Episode

  • How mindful devices can improve our working lives
  • The fast, messy and global nature of business increases our stress
  • Why mindfulness is the best quality to possess in the digital age

Established in 2013, Digital Mindfulness is an independent think tank located in London.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Jerusalem Post article: about De-know-polization by Prof. Yesha Sivan


Let us begin with a fundamental observation of the “de-monopolization” of knowledge, a.k.a. "de-know-polization." Until the end of the 20th century, universities were the societal leaders in the creation, transfer and usage of knowledge. Today, however, this historical role is fundamentally changing.

Most universities are no longer the best place to do research and teach. Their societal service as hubs of knowledge and innovation can be done more effectively elsewhere. What used to be their natural monopoly is currently under attack.

De-know-polization is both a cause for and a response to the disruption of this old monopoly, rising from globalization and digitization. As de-know-polization reveals itself, university leaders will need to take actions, and justify these actions to their public and private funders, including students paying tuition and taxpayers.

Taxpayers will ask how does university research affect our quality of life? Why do we need to fund professors' travel and publishing papers that have little relevance to our society? On the other hand, students, their parents, and other funders of education will ask where is the best place to learn? Who gives the best value for the investment?

Where is the best place to do research in computer science? The answer is probably Google, Facebook, Microsoft or IBM. The livelihood of such firms depends on new products and services that stem from their research. Their researchers do not have to teach; they usually have the needed resources of time, money and equipment – and they have business managers that push for value. Private firms, or dedicated research organizations, seem like a better answer than the usual university faculty-driven research or labs.

Most university teaching is akin to horses in the ages of cars. An extra-terrestrial observer will wonder why we keep putting people into the same lackluster context of ineffectiveness potentially causing torture by boredom. The classical model of several students listening to a lecture in the same room is tired, often resulting in only a quarter of students listening, a quarter spending their time on Facebook or Tinder, a quarter sleeping or dreaming based on the previous apps, and the rest are not even in class. Online education, including massive open online courses, is but a small step in the right direction.

Universities that will continue with “older” teaching methods and not embrace the new tools will not be able to justify their funding.

Moreover, assuming that we need to fund teaching – shouldn’t we fund it in the best place possible? Could not-for-profits provide a better social service than researchers that also need to teach? Why invest in a ‘jack of all trades’ rather than a ‘master of one’?

What about societal service? We cannot anymore justify the public investment in universities in the age of globalization and digitization. Capital and people are flowing to the best place for their goals. There is much less reason to be near a university anymore, and funding a university with the hope of getting good jobs and firms only diverts resources from other, more effective policy actions – like lower tax with direct impact on business, or enhancing quality of life, itself a pull for economic growth.

Our message to university leaders and policy-makers, further elaborated in the recent issue of Coller Venture Review is to be aware of the various threats and opportunities, particularly when it comes to the evolving role of universities within the evolving venture ecosystem. Don't think business is as usual – seek new models for research, teaching and service. A plan of no action will lead to an inevitable demise. Business as usual now means no business at all in the future. Better you lead the change, than let the change lead you.

Prof. Yesha Sivan is an Executive Director, Coller Institute of Venture, Tel Aviv University. Coller Institute is a member of IATI (Israel Advanced Technology Industries)